Pagan parents: are your sons in Boy Scouts?

Either way, would you help a reporter out?  I’m interested in what you think of the Boy Scouts of America in the wake of the organization clearing the way for gay leaders.

If you are involved, what’s the buzz?  How are people within scouting reacting?

If your boy is not a scout, was that your decision?  Was it based in part on a pall of discrimination?  Would you reconsider in light of these developments?

No matter your involvement, I’d also like to know what value you see in scouting for Pagan boys.

Email me: tpw@protonmail.ch to participate.  Signal boost in any way you can to help me get the word out.  Thank you. 

 

Hellenists and Pagan parents, can you help a reporter out?

After expressing my opinions on Percy Jackson, I find myself assigned an article on the topic for The Wild Hunt.

I’d like to talk to Hellenists who love, hate, or are ambivalent about these books, so long as you’ve got reasons and can explain them!

However, I also want to talk to the kids who have read them, which means I need some Pagan parents to introduce me.  Yes, allowing one’s children to talk to strangers is not without risks, but I am more than happy to do what I must to mitigate those risks and maintain parental comfort levels.  In a perfect world, I’d like to talk to your kids directly (phone or some other way that I can hear their voices), because we communicate differently in writing than we do when talking.  Parents are welcome to listen in, although I’d prefer they zip their lips and let the kiddies say what they will without prompting.  However, if sending questions via email and receiving transcribed answers is all you’re comfortable with, I’ll take it.  I will also allow the parent to control what identifying information I include in the story.

Pagan professionals and business owners, I have questions for you

I’m working on a business article, and I am looking for people to help me round it out.  Specifically, I would like to talk to Pagans who own a business or practice which has broad appeal outside the Pagan community.  I have talked to a lot of people who market products or services largely to the Pagan community, from Reiki-infused massage and runic divination to crafted and blessed ritual tools.  I’m now looking to talk to Pagan accounts, lawyers, mechanics, electricians, restaurateurs, landscapers, and doctors whose products and services are of general interest beyond our corner of the world.

This is for an article, but I will associate your responses with the name you provide, so make sure you spell it correctly.

Hey you astrologers! I need you!

I’m readying myself to write an article on an astrological topic, and I’d like to talk to some Pagans who do this professionally or semi-professionally.  If you get paid for astrological readings, and write about the topic for a site or publication that you don’t also run, I have a couple of questions for you.

Help me if you’ve been depressed

After sharing my views on depression, I started wondering about how people apply their religious symbols to the problem, for a story at The Wild Hunt.  I have been introduced to several professionals in the mental health field who may speak to me on the subject, but I’m also interested in what self-care techniques depressed Pagans and polytheists of all stripes use to try to manage the condition.

What are the religious (including magical, if that’s part of your religion) symbols, techniques, practices, or beliefs that you use to manage depression?  How successful have they been?

Good news is bad news

Well I am getting a lot of feedback to my request for cisgendered folk, thanks to some kind helpers, so much so that I have to be careful not to overcompensate and sideline the people that live with ill-fitting pronouns every day. This is a good problem to have, and I am appreciative to be in this position, but don’t be afraid to contact me no matter your gender, okay?

Curiously, the feedback I’m getting is entirely from ciswomen.  Cismales, step up and represent!

Help me find cisgendered Pagans to talk to

I’m working on a story for The Wild Hunt about gender and language.  In what may be a comment on where the Pagan and polytheist communities are at these days, I am having more difficulty finding cisgendered people to talk to than anyone else, so I’m hoping for a signal boost.  If you haven’t a clue what “cisgender” means, it likely refers to you:  it’s a word which describes those of whose bodies and gender identities happen to match each other; if you consider yourself a “he” or a “she” and have never questioned that identification, you are certainly a cisgendered person.

My piece will deal mostly with pronouns, so my ideal subjects are people who are aware that there are other pronouns beyond he and she that people use in English to identify themselves or others, whether or not you use those pronouns yourself.  I’m also not opposed to talking to more people who are not cisgendered, because I need all the help I can get since I’m a cismale and I expect I’m more ignorant than I can imagine.  As of this writing, though, I don’t have any cisgendered folk weighing in, and while that may help the majority understand what it’s like to be silenced, it doesn’t make for good journalism.

I will use your preferred name (and pronouns) if I quote you, and I don’t mind not including your name so long as your commentary isn’t abusive.